In addition, extraterrestrial spouses or children who are victims of battery or extreme cruelty by a stranger described above may be entitled to NACARA 203 benefits before an immigration judge. After five years, an agreement was finally reached between the applicants and, for the most part, the NSIS. This is probably because litigation has been very costly over the past five years and a trial would have cost even more. The complainants had also gathered a considerable amount of evidence and had, which seemed to be a very strong argument against INS. [9] In the end, the complainants were able to secure de novo Adjudication for many Guatemalan and Salvadoran migrants awaiting further interviews, were also granted a stay of deportation and work permits. However, those who did not meet the arrival time or committed a serious crime were excluded from trespassing and payment. CONSIDERING, the complainants, many Salvadoran and Guatemalan citizens in the United States, filed this complaint. systemic challenges in the processing of asylum claims by Salvadorans and Guatemalans, in accordance with the Refugee Act 1980 and the provisions adopted there; and CONSIDERING that the asylum treatment system has been significantly changed by regulations in force on 1 October 1990; and among the new asylum provisions, as well as in the old ones: foreign policy and border enforcement considerations are not relevant to determining whether an asylum seeker has a justified fear of persecution… The fact that a person is from a country whose government supports the United States or with which he or she has a favourable relationship is irrelevant in determining whether an asylum seeker has a justified fear of persecution.

. ; and WHEREAS, . . . . The Attorney General may designate a foreign state (or part of it) to grant temporary protection status to nationals of that state; and CONSIDERING that Section 303 of the Immigration Act 1990 designates El Salvador under SECTION 244A of the INA, thus entitling Salvadorans to temporary protection status that meets the requirements of Section 303 . . .

THEREFORE, the applicant and the defendant, conclude and specify that this agreement imposes binding obligations on the parties and their successors and that this agreement constitutes a comprehensive and comprehensive solution to the issues raised in this appeal. Q: What happens if my spouse or child is no longer allowed to be admitted to my refugee claim? A: A spouse or child who is no longer eligible to be admitted to your refugee claim may continue to receive ABC benefits if he or she is a registered ABC class member that you indicated in your refugee claim before the deadline expires. To retain ABC benefits, your family member must file their own refugee claim within 90 days of the USCIS informing them that they are no longer allowed to be included in your claim. In addition, in order to qualify for ABC benefits, the registered ABC class member must either have applied for asylum prior to registration or have applied for asylum on a specified date. For members of the Guatemalan class, the date of the asylum application was January 3, 1995 and, for members of the Salvadoran class, it was February 16, 1996 or within 90 days of issuing a Notice 5 [sent to Salvadorans who had asked TPS to register as a member of the ABC class].